High-School Help: Getting a JOB

Hello world, it’s Elizabeth, hope you are all having a fabulous day!

Today is a special day, because you get to meet high school Elizabeth…

180569_10150135302953767_2838849_nI know. You’re all wishing you could’ve been this cool. Note: letterman jacket=automatic coolness

If you’re anything like high-school Elizabeth, who gave zero thought to being proactive about college besides the usual college and scholarship applications, you may want to listen up! Obviously visiting colleges and and making decent ACT/SAT grades are the classic “to-do’s” before college. But what are other ways to proactively prepare you for college?

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One great way to be proactive is to get some work experience. College is a great time to commit to a long-term job or internship, and, along with great grades and work ethic, your employers will be looking for prior work experience.

Now remember high-school Elizabeth.

172_8072718766_916_nYup.

She had no clue how to apply for a job or even where to begin looking. Thankfully, I’m no longer high-school Elizabeth, and I’ve learned a few things about getting a part-time job that I’d love to share with you!

But first, I took a poll up here in the Tele-tower and found out what the MC Choctawk-ers first jobs were in high-school:

Elizabeth (me), age 16- Jewelry maker at the Beehive retail store.

Hannah, age 18- Nanny for 2 eight and eleven year old sisters

Lauren, age 15- Snow cone maker at SnoBiz!

Morgan, age 14- Marketing team for Chik-Fil-A

Micheal, age 15- Children’s intern at Calvary Baptist Waynesborro

Hunter, age 19- Work staff at Lake Forest Ranch (summer job)

Andrew, age 13- Waiter at Friends & Company

Kirk, age 16- cashier at Brookshires

JJ, age 16- church janitor

Hopefully, this gives you a little insight into how utterly random your high-school part-time jobs can be! Between the nine of us here, we’ve had our hands in ministry, manual labor, babysitting, food services, retail, and more!

149_20006107264_2372_nHere’s high-school Morgan rockin’ her Chik Fil A uniform. Leaping for joy because she has a part-time job! 

First thing to note when looking for a part-time job: There’s a lot of variety out there in the job market, so take advantage of it! Find something you will enjoy or are curious about and go for it! High-school jobs are temporary and have a life-span of about 3 months to 2 years, so now is the time to take risks and be creative. You probably won’t be there for long!

Second thing: Use the people you know! Whether it’s people from your church, your teachers, or your friend’s parents, you probably have some connections with adults in the working world. Believe it or not, these adults (even  your parents’ friends) can greatly help connect you with a job!

Third thing: Be as professional as possible. When interviewing for a job, dress nicely and professionally. You want to give a good impression to your employer and let him/her know you are serious about this job. Once you’re hired, it’s still important to dress appropriately. Even if you’re working at a Snow Cone stand, this is still your job and it’s important to be above reproach in every way. If your grandma came for a snow cone, would your outfit make her proud?

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Last thing: Remember to be modest. Modesty is not just for girls, nor does it only have to do with the way you dress. Modesty is how you carry yourself. Carry yourself in a way that says you are here to serve, work hard, do your best. Balancing modesty with confidence communicates a work ethic that is not all about yourself. This is the attitude that gets hired.

Happy job hunting!

-Elizabeth, former jewelry-maker, life-time learner

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